Species

The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™ is the world's most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species. It uses a set of criteria to evaluate the extinction risk of thousands of species and subspecies. These...

IUCN has recently updated the Red List of Bangladesh by assessing 1619 species from seven animal groups. This article for the first time records the Red List Index (RLI) for each of these groups and creates a baseline to measure species conservation initiatives in Bangladesh.

The IUCN Red List of Threatened SpeciesTM helps us to understand the extinction risk of species at global to national scales. After completing the assessment against a set of criteria, a species is placed into one of IUCN Red List categories. Of these...
Blog
Engaging communities as partners in combatting illegal wildlife trade (IWT) is increasingly recognized as critical, but has proven difficult to operationalize in a meaningful and sustainable manner given the current level of threat. While there is growing...

The Thailand Environmental Education Center (EEC) organised the first “Fighting Extinction Day” on 2 April 2017 to present research findings from the Fighting Extinction Project.  EEC Thailand uses The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™, one of IUCN’s main conservation tools, to guide student research work on the ground. All five species presented at this event – the Kitti's hog-nosed bat, goral, dugong, whale shark and leatherback sea turtle –are listed by the IUCN as Threatened with Extinction. 

The project was launched in April 2016 with three main objectives: 1.     To develop children and youth into environmentalists and conservation leaders, and to inspire the general public to participate in the preservation and protection...
Event
  Project title: Community Based Sustainable Management of Tanguar Haor (Bridging Phase) Location: Tanguar Haor, Sunamganj District, Sylhet Division Project duration: September 2016 – December 2017 Project background: Tanguar...

Manta rays are graceful, iconic marine animals sought out by scuba divers around the globe. Far less well-recognised are the devil rays, a group of nine species that are closely related to manta rays and are indistinguishable to all except experts. While the popularity and name recognition of manta rays with tourists has led to heightened interest in conserving them, devil rays are getting far less attention, increasing the risk of further population declines – write Julia M Lawson and Nicholas K Dulvy of IUCN Species Survival Commission’s Shark Specialist Group (SSG).

Both devil and manta rays are threatened by the international trade in their gill plates. The rays are filter-feeders, using their cartilaginous gill plate filaments to ‘sieve’ a living – filtering plankton and small fishes from the sunlit surface waters....
Blog

IUCN Bangladesh with the support of Bangladesh Forest Department established the country’s first-ever Vulture Rescue Centre in November 2016. The centre has successfully rescued and rehabilitated eight Himalayan Griffons and released the vultures back to the wild on 6 March 2017.

After months of treatment and care, eight Himalayan Griffon vultures were released back into the wild by IUCN Bangladesh and Bangladesh Forest Department. The vultures were cared for in the temporary Vulture Rescue Centre that was established in the Singra...
Article

Advocating for wildlife conservation, IDEA has taken five endangered animals of Azerbaijan under its supervision – the “Big Five” project: the Goitered Gazelle, the Caucasian Leopard, the Imperial Eagle, the Brown Bear and the Grey Wolf, implementing a number of measures to protect each of them. The transboundary efforts on “Reintroduction of the Goitered Gazelle” were launched to increase the population of gazelles (Gazella subgutturosa) in the region by resettling them into their natural habitats.

 

In the early 20th century up to 60,000 gazelles grazed in the plains of Azerbaijan but suffered drastic reductions in population later. Over the years this graceful animal with slender horns had been hunted and its habitat had shrunk due to intensive...
Article (section level)

On this year’s International Day of Forests (21 March), the Government of Bangladesh has unveiled two new publications on Asian Elephants in the country. These books reveal the latest estimates of Bangladesh’s elephants along with their distribution, routes, and corridors. Haseeb Md. Irfanullah of IUCN Bangladesh explains what this new knowledge means to us.

IUCN has recently investigated the total number of resident wild elephants in Bangladesh and it gives an official estimate of 268 elephants, all residing in south-eastern forest areas of the country. The previous elephant count for Bangladesh was also...
Blog

In the last months, INCA has initiated collaboration with the international organization Four PAWS, national institutions and partners to work on the wildlife mistreatment and captivity, focusing on the Brown Bear as the most vulnerable species in this respect in the country. Currently, some 40 to 50 bears are kept in captivity in Albania, while there is no official database on other wildlife held illegally. The Brown Bear illegal trafficking and trade is still present, despite being forbidden by the national legislation and international conventions.

Most of the time bears are kept in cages - far from complying required standards. There are also isolated cases of bears being treated like pets and posing a risk for the lives of local residents. The Ministry of Environment led national activists and...
Article (section level)

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