Protected Areas

Equity and justice in PA conservation

The important global, national and local benefits provided by protected areas may come at a cost to communities, and any resultant experience of injustice can undermine protected area conservation. Conversely, the success of many areas conserved by Indigenous Peoples and local communities makes a compelling case for the stronger engagement of local rights-holders and stakeholders in all types of protected area. The Convention on Biological Diversity recognises the need to govern and manage protected areas effectively and equitably.

For this reason, a number of key partners have explored the concepts of equity and justice in the context of ecosystem services, to develop a framework for enhancing equity and justice in protected area management (at site and systems levels).

This 12-month project responds to the demand expressed by the CBD and the IUCN World Parks Congress that protected areas should be managed equitably. The project will draw on two completed ESPA projects. The framework will be validated through fieldwork at three sites in East Africa and a regional workshop in Nairobi. The project brings together academics and practitioners with a wealth of expertise in conservation, protected area management and the challenges of working at the science-policy interface. 

Publications

From livelihoods to equity for better protected area conservation - IIEDFrom livelihoods to equity for better protected area conservation, August 2016

Phil Franks, Adrian Martin, Kate Schreckenberg

Meeting social goals is widely considered essential for effective biodiversity conservation. The dominant approach to meeting social goals has focused mainly on support for local livelihoods, but this has often proved inadequate for achieving either social goals or conservation effectiveness. A priority for the global conservation community now is to rethink its approach to social goals. This will require a shift in framing from livelihoods to equity, where equity integrates issues of protected area costs and benefits with protected area governance. This briefing explains why an equity framing is important and how, in broad terms, a move from a livelihoods framing to equity might be achieved.

Advancing equity in protected area conservation

Advancing equity in protected area conservation, February 2016

Phil Franks, Kate Schreckenberg

The important global, national and local benefits provided by protected areas may come at a cost to communities, and any resultant experience of injustice can undermine protected area conservation. Conversely, the success of many areas conserved by Indigenous Peoples and local communities makes a compelling case for the stronger engagement of local rights-holders and stakeholders in all types of protected area. The Convention on Biological Diversity recognises the need to govern and manage protected areas effectively and equitably; this briefing provides an equity framework to support policymakers, protected area managers, Indigenous Peoples, local communities and other local stakeholders in achieving this.

ESPA project

Partners

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